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Posts tagged “Lake Shore Cryotronics

November 2018 newsletter now online

November 2018 NewsletterThe Elliot Scientific November newsletter is now available. In this issue a new digital micromirror device (DMD) is announced by Prizmatix for targeting light, and we also show off their UHP-M light source, both for microscopy; Lake Shore Cryotronics distributed cryogenic temperature sensing systems get a mention, along with IPG‘s ultrafast lasers; and we finish off with how capacitance measurement equipment from Andeen-Hagerling can help in a huge variety of research and industrial applications.

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ICEC27-ICMC 2018 opens next week. Meet Lake Shore on the exhibition days.

The International Cryogenic Engineering (ICEC) and Materials (ICMC) Conferences are taking place in Oxford from September 3rd to the 7th.


ICEC27-ICMC 2018, to give it its correct name, also includes two days of exhibition for cryogenic related businesses. Accordingly, our good friends from Lake Shore Cryotronics will be flying in from Columbus, Ohio, to be on hand to talk about their extensive range of products for research in low temperature big and little physics, materials and superconductivity, cryobiology and more.

As Elliot Scientific supplies Lake Shore products within the UK and Ireland, our Dr Perry will also be on hand to assist with any enquiries on the Tuesday and Wednesday (5th & 6th September).

Both the conference and Lake Shore are celebrating 50th anniversaries this year. It is fifty years since ICEC was first held in this country, and also fifty years since Lake Shore manufactured its first product.

 


August 2018 newsletter now online…

August 2018 NewsletterThe Elliot Scientific August newsletter is now available. In this issue an IPG laser, Lake Shore temperature sensors and Siskiyou IXF components are used in a breakthrough Los Alamos & University of New Mexico all optical cryocooler; microscopists can benefit from Elliot Scientific Optical Tweezers, the Mad City Labs RM21 platform, and microspectroscopy from CRAIC Technologies; plus ICEC27-ICMC 2018 in Oxford and more…

To view it in a browser, click here.

To read it magazine-style online, click here.

To download it as a PDF, click here.

 

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From near absolute to over one thousand degrees – Lake Shore have a sensor to suit

With the UK’s record breaking hot weather continuing, we thought you might like to know that Lake Shore Cryotronics offer four types of sensor for temperature measurement:

Diodes
A diode temperature sensor is the general name for a class of semiconductor temperature sensors. They are based on the temperature dependence of the forward voltage drop across a p-n junction. The voltage change with temperature depends on the material. The most common is Silicon, but Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) and Gallium Aluminium Arsenide (GaAlAs) are also used.

Resistors
These sensors are based on the change of resistance with temperature, and can be classified as positive temperature coefficient (PTC) or negative temperature coefficient (NTC). Platinum RTDs are the best example of PTC resistance sensors.

Capacitors
Capacitors are also used for low temperatures, but usually not for temperature measurement. Capacitance temperature sensors have the advantage of being insensitive to magnetic fields, but they commonly experience calibration shifts after thermal cycling.

Thermocouples
Thermocouples are only useful where differential temperature measurements or low mass are the main consideration. They must be calibrated in-situ as the entire length of the wire contributes to the output voltage if it traverses a temperature gradient.

Each type sensor has its own particular advantages in terms of temperature range and response, as well as design features and drawbacks, so Elliot Scientific recommends contacting us to discuss your application and its requirements.

Lake Shore also do some nice instruments to go with their sensors!

 

 

 

 

 


Laser Focus World features Siskiyou IXF mounts on cover for Los Alamos/UNM story

The July issue of Laser Focus World magazine uses a photo of a YLF:Yb crystal mounted between two top-adjustable Siskiyou IXF monolithic tip/tilt flexure mounts to illustrate their feature story on an all-solid-state optical cryocooler developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of New Mexico.

Solid-state optical refrigeration uses anti-Stokes fluorescence to cool macroscopic objects to cryogenic temperatures without the annoying vibrations typically introduced by mechanical cryocooling systems.

The crystal was excited by a low power linearly-polarised continuous-wave fibre laser by IPG Photonics, while the temperature was monitored with a calibrated DT-670-SD silicon diode from Lake Shore Cryotronics.

Coupling the laser light to the crystal was achieved by using an astigmatic Herriott cell, with the optics held in vacuum compatible Siskiyou IXF flexure mounts…  known for their excellent mechanical and thermal properties.

Researchers in the UK or Ireland wishing to replicate this experiment can contact us for research lasers from IPG Photonics, sensors and instrumentation from Lake Shore Cryotronics, and the full range of mounts and stages from Siskiyou. Elliot Scientific can also be approached to supply optics and custom machined parts as well.

The full paper describing the experiment can be read here on nature.com.

 

 

 

 

 


Lake Shore reaches half century… wants your stories.

Lake Shore turns 50 this year and the company intends to commemorate this achievement by putting together a special publication entitled Lake Shore Cryotronics: The First 50 Years.

So, they want to hear from customers who have, in some way or another, worked with Lake Shore. Be it as an employee, a trading partner, or as a user of their products.

To share your story or experience with Lake Shore, visit this page. Photographs welcome.

For more information about Lake Shore products, please contact us.

 

 


Lake Shore Cryotronics introduces F-series Teslameters

The new F41 Single-axis and F71 Multi-axis Teslameters from Lake Shore Cryotronics offer a new level of precision and convenience for engineers, QC technicians, and lab researchers. In conjunction with a new series of compatible Hall probes and 2Dex™ Hall sensors, users can measure with confidence in challenging applications.

The TiltView™ display makes them easy to operate even when mounted in the bottom of a rack or on the bench, and probe swapping is now much faster due to a compact quick-release connector and integrated calibration data for all probes.

TruZero™ technology
Lake Shore’s TruZero™ technology eliminates the need to perform frequent zero gauss chambering as an onboard algorithm combines the sequential Hall voltage readings in a way that eliminates any offsets due to misalignment and thermoelectric effects. It also improves precision and accuracy.

Please contact us for more information.


Next week, we’re at Magnetism 2018 with Lake Shore Cryotronics

Next Monday and Tuesday, the 9th and 10th of April, we will be at the University of Manchester for Magnetism 2018, supporting the Lake Shore Cryotronics team. A mix of invited talkers and submitted contributions will be exploring the breadth of magnetism research in the UK and Republic of Ireland.  Subjects will include the areas of thin films and nanostructures, spintronics, permanent magnetic materials, correlated electrons, nanoparticles and biological/biomedical applications of magnetism, computational magnetism and more.

 


The Model 155 MeasureReady™ power source offers unprecedented simplicity and intuitive operation as video shows

Lake Shore’s new Model 155 MeasureReady™ precision I/V source is ideal for demanding scientific applications requiring a precise low-noise supply of current or voltage, for example electronic material characterisation. Supplying 1 W maximum from DC to 100 kHz over a broad output range, these power supplies deliver a solid foundation for I/V curve, Hall effect, and other fundamental measurements.

The clutter-free touch display with a unique TiltView™ screen presents a natural and engaging user interface. No confusing buttons or long learning curves make the Model 155 as easy to use as a smartphone. With similar connectivity – Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, USB, plus LAN – it offers convenient remote operation via LabVIEW™, a custom PC interface, or mobile app.

Features

  • Bipolar, 4-quadrant I/V source
  • DC and AC modes supported up to 100 kHz
  • Full scale ranges from 10 mV to 100 V (1 µA to 100 mA)
  • 0.001% programming resolution
  • Low peak to peak noise: from 1 µV at 10 mV full scale
  • Manual and autorange function
  • Smartphone-based touchscreen user interface

Please contact us for more information.


R&D Magazine declares the 8600 VSM from Lake Shore Cryotronics a winner

The 8600 Series VSMs from Lake Shore Cryotronics [ @LakeShoreCryo ] has been recognised as one of “100 most technologically significant new products in 2017” at an awards ceremony organised by R&D Magazine.

The VSM was re-imagined, focusing on a clean ergonomic design that would simplify a researcher’s interaction with the system. For example, a motorised head brings the sample to a comfortable height for easy, one-handed exchange of the sample rods.

This superior magnetometer, through both performance and convenience, offers very high sensitivity and a super-fast magnetic field ramp rate. Temperature options include a cryostat, high-temperature oven, and single stage variable temperature insert. The combined temperature range of the options is 4.2 to 1273 K, and all three options quickly slide into place and are auto-detected by the system’s software – video demonstration.

8600 Series Features

  • 0.25 × 10-7 emu noise floor at 10 s/pt
  • 10 ms/pt data acquisition rate
  • 10,000 Oe/s field ramp rate
  • Rapid, repeatable temperature option exchange
  • High stability—±0.05% per day
  • Fields to 3.26 T
  • Widest available temperature range—4.2 K to 1273 K

The magnet poles are also easily adjusted with a specially designed indexed positioning system that allows the pole gap to be set at one of six repeatable positions, eliminating the need to recalibrate after each change.


TFor more information about the new 8600 Series VSM, please contact us.


5 electronic measurement pitfalls you’ve probably forgotten about…

Kevin Carmichael, of Lake Shore Cryotronics, has authored a paper outlining common errors that can be made during precision electronic measurements. Whether you are new to electronic device measurements or a pro, you’ll want to avoid these pitfalls to prevent:

  • Voltage errors
  • Current leakage
  • Ground loops
  • Field-induced interference
  • Source-related noise

To read more about how to do this, download 5 Electronic Measurement Pitfalls You Learned About in School But Probably Forgot.

About the Author

Kevin Carmichael is Senior Marketing Product Manager for Lake Shore Cryotronics responsible for material characterisation systems and instrumentation. This includes the company’s new line of high-performance, simple-to-use MeasureReady™ I/V sources for engineers and scientists requiring a very precise, low-noise source of current or voltage in the lab.


Lake Shore’s temperature sensor data is now online

Lake Shore is now offering all their temperature sensor information in one convenient online page. The new Sensors’ page contains links to:

  • Datasheets
  • Installation instructions
  • Application notes
  • Catalogue pages

Lake Shore logoOver the coming months, Lake Shore will migrate away from shipping calibration data CDs with calibrated sensors and will instead only offer this data via a portal accessible from the new page.

Data is currently available online for sensors shipped since the beginning of 2016, so if an existing CD is lost or damaged, the calibration data can be quickly downloaded providing you have the serial number of the relevant sensor on hand. Alternatively, contact Lake Shore Service for archived curves.

Image of Saturn by Cassini courtesy of NASA

 

Lake Shore space-qualified sensors were on the hugely successful Cassini Huygens mission to Saturn that ended earlier this month.

Nearly twenty years of gathering temperature information in an extreme environment is a good advert for their sensors, and Elliot Scientific often supplies them to the aerospace industry and space scientists in the UK and Ireland.

Please contact us for more information.