Solution Science for Research and Industry

From near absolute to over one thousand degrees – Lake Shore have a sensor to suit

With the UK’s record breaking hot weather continuing, we thought you might like to know that Lake Shore Cryotronics offer four types of sensor for temperature measurement:

Diodes
A diode temperature sensor is the general name for a class of semiconductor temperature sensors. They are based on the temperature dependence of the forward voltage drop across a p-n junction. The voltage change with temperature depends on the material. The most common is Silicon, but Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) and Gallium Aluminium Arsenide (GaAlAs) are also used.

Resistors
These sensors are based on the change of resistance with temperature, and can be classified as positive temperature coefficient (PTC) or negative temperature coefficient (NTC). Platinum RTDs are the best example of PTC resistance sensors.

Capacitors
Capacitors are also used for low temperatures, but usually not for temperature measurement. Capacitance temperature sensors have the advantage of being insensitive to magnetic fields, but they commonly experience calibration shifts after thermal cycling.

Thermocouples
Thermocouples are only useful where differential temperature measurements or low mass are the main consideration. They must be calibrated in-situ as the entire length of the wire contributes to the output voltage if it traverses a temperature gradient.

Each type sensor has its own particular advantages in terms of temperature range and response, as well as design features and drawbacks, so Elliot Scientific recommends contacting us to discuss your application and its requirements.

Lake Shore also do some nice instruments to go with their sensors!

 

 

 

 

 

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